I was given this unhallmarked ring by a friend who found it whilst metal detecting in the southwest (I think it was Arizona I can check). . Have you any ideas ?

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I found a long lost brother might, be from the same mother.
art deco Navajo…no words

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How cool! That’s quite amazing, thanks.

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Hi, are you aware that just the one pic shows up? I’d like to see the others if possible.
Thank you!

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screen capture. static, not interactive

source link: https://www.etsy.com/listing/992166402/art-deco-sterling-and-turquoise-ring <<<<<click

screen capture freezes the moment in time. links to web pages like ebay & etsy vanish after sale is completed

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Thank you Steve, much better with all the pics and a really nice ring too!

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Nice ring, and @Steve, good find as usual. BTW they’re not actually “Art Deco” era, more like 1950s-60s.

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yeah, my art deco Navajo…no words tag was a face palm salute to another etsy sellers fantastical description :grin:

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@chicfarmer You touched on an online listing gaffe that always makes me chuckle. Twice I’ve seen listings for a sterling silver turquoise ring described as ‘a 1920s Art Deco Navajo ring’. Art Deco, um, nope.

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I love this ring, not for it’s beauty alone, but because it was given by a good friend who had spent time down there and found it with a metal detector. The fact it has a pair is cool, wish I had bought it.in fact I’m going to try and make one with some rare Iberian turquoise I discovered. The turquoise it would seem is linked to the ancient Iberian warrior tribes who lived here in pre-roman times. A piece of the turquoise is possibly in a museum piece of Tartessian era, a golden diadem about 2600 yrs old. Supposedly there is an as yet undiscovered golden temple in the mountain.

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Tom, in my opinion both rings stand out for having a mass Indian jewelry supply “look” but possibly being made by the same hand.

Your ring has the added factors of how it came to you.

The side banter here touches on a few other threads here in the forum that highlight sellers wild descriptions and claims and certainly not on the quality or style of your ring

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Thanks Steve. Does the fact of not having hallmark mean the maker didn’t bother? Or that some artists did, others didn’t use marks? Or that before certain year it wasn’t practise?

I appreciate your help.

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the long answer to your question takes up a dozen or so pages in Bille Hougarts book on identifying hallmarks, both artist and shops.

1936, in an era when few Indian handcrafted silver items were identifiable by a stamp or other mark.

Up to, and shortly after, World War II most “jewelry-makers remained anonymous craftsmen
to the majority of non-native consumers"

1954 The Navajo Guild promotes hallmark use by its
members

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I’m confused, you said “here” when discussing the Iberian turquoise. Is that where you live? Is that Spain? Or am I misunderstanding.

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Yes. I live in the deep heart of the interior of what is now Portugal.

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So cool!! Welcome to the site!! I’ve never been overseas, but where you live looks beautiful.

So your friend found the ring in Portugal? It’s lovely. I might have to Google some more to learn about the history of your area.

Edit: I just reread your title, he found it in the southwest. Guess I should read more closely :laughing:

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No my friend worked there in the south west for many yrs. Many Portuguese work abroad. They discovered Brazil. He worked there. I am a “turquoise person”, as I found turquoise here and became fascinated by it. So his ring means a lot to me.

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This part of Iberia is quite arid.

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Now I’m curious. Are you located in Extremadura?

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Yes. The Extremadura of Spain meets with Portugal. It’s where I live.

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