Red Coral and Silver Necklace Attributed to Marie Aguilar

I have just purchased this necklace. It is attributed to Marie Aguilar and was purchased through a middleman from a longtime collector. I have also been told by Arlene Aguilar (Tony Sr’s daughter-in-law) that she and her husband Luther worked with good coral. It is my understanding that she passed about 10 years ago. I have seen a couple of articles mentioning her.
I am interested in your opinions about the coral and an approximate value if possible. The necklace is 30”-eight strands with silver and a neck wrap. Thanks for your help.



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It’s beautiful; I like the silver mixed in. I think next summer at Eiteljorg Art Market I may look for something like that. Unless I get distracted by Mary Tafoya, Ira Custer, or the gentleman I bought the ring from (Milford Calamity) :laughing:

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Yep, I know the feeling. :joy:

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It is sold in 18" strands, so you have maybe 12 strands if that total is 30" with the wrap. This size sells around $135 a strand. Then the value of the artists’ work.


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Thank you very much for that info. And then there’s a silver value too. And I have no idea how to put a value on her labor. But all that considered I think I did pretty good on the price.

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I like the way the small silver beads are interspersed in; pretty

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It finally got here today. The silver are actually covers over small pieces of coral. It feels good to the touch and the wrapped back is very comfortable.

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I just ran across this in the March 1975 Arizona Highways magazine. Reminded me of yours.
The caption says “Eighteen strands of old coral beads from three old pawn necklaces adorned with old silver tube beads. From McGee’s Indian Den collection.”

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Thanks AC! You did good. I see the three different necklaces that they have joined together. Mine is like the one with the tubular coral and the tubular silver covers. I also like the one with the tubular coral and the round beads.
I appreciate you sharing that. I’m going to save the picture to add to my jewelry book. Hope you had a great :turkey: day! :blush:

Nice piece @Islandmomma! I have a similar tubular coral necklace with sterling and turquoise beads. I have no idea who the maker might be; I obtained it from Marti Struever years ago; evidently she didn’t know. It’s 14 strands with the traditional neck wrap. Just FYI, the ring and earring are Marie Marie Lincoln.


I’d love to see more Santo Domingo (Kewa) coral pieces.

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Love both of your necklaces. @Bmpdvm, I have a Marie Marie Lincoln cluster ring in onyx. I originally had one in coral and LOST IT😭. Then a few years later I found the same style ring at the Indian Craft Shop in the US Department of the Interior in DC and snapped it up. I actually prefer it in the black.

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WOW, a little more to indicate vintage. Your necklace is beautiful. I like the little discs of turquoise. They just add a little something extra. :blush:

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Oh, this thread is making me gaga. :star_struck: @Bmpdvm your necklace and its little companions are outta this world. There’s a lovely page with three similar necklaces in the Pueblo Bead jewelry book. Sorry for the poor lighting and color reproduction: these are all with silver bits interspersed.

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Here’s my only one

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Nice necklace. It’s cool to see all of the many variations of this tubular coral that were made into necklaces. So similar and yet so different. :blush:

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Are there any thoughts about the use of cones and hooks as opposed to the “pueblo wrap?” It seems to me older pieces have the wraps more frequently, but the pieces @chicfarmer posted that are in Paula Baxter’s book are cone and hook and are “mid-20th century.” Is it just the up to the artist, or is there something else?

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purty stuff
have a bunch of coral but (because of my first find?) I’ve gone big-lol
so far,it’s all been real but most color enhanced?

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If I had to guess it would relate to Native use vs commercially sold necklaces. The wrap is more ethnographic and perhaps came off less as finished jewelry for mainstream tourists (not necessarily students of the culture). Same thing with squash blossom necklaces. Findings and the ability to detach spoke to customer expectations.

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