Hmmmmm? Native American?

I am not sure what this is. I feel it has to be worth the 50 cents that I paid for it. The turquoise looks real. Is the orangish reddish stuff red coral? Is it good, or someone’s DIY project?

FYI
I really appreciate y’all helping me out. I know I don’t really have anything to contribute in return. I am learning quite a bit by studying y’all’s forum. So, thanks!

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It reminds me of a Treasure Necklace. The red nuggets look like coral. Hard to tell if natural or dyed.
I would call it a Southwest or Native American style necklace. Hard to determine who actually made it.

Yes, worth at least 50 cents.

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Thanks Fern. I googled treasure necklaces and I think maybe that is what this is. I didn’t see anything as simple as this one, but some were sort of similar.
My biggest issue is I never can tell if something is Native American unless it is signed. It seems like there are many fakes out there. Are there any books specifically on how to spot fakes?
Everything I buy is from garage or estate sales. So unless the person who is having the sale can tell me where it came from, I know nothing about the pieces I buy.

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If I had to guess, it’s by a 1970s artisan inspired by NA jewelry, but not itself Native American made. The “coral” is dyed sponge coral (inexpensive). Cute for the price!

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I thought it had a hippy vibe to it. I was thinking sponge coral as well. But I wasn’t sure about the smaller more solid red beads. Thanks😁

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Agree about hippie, wanted to say so above but kept it more generic. :grinning:

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Have you read this: What makes a Fetish necklace valuable?

It is about fetish necklaces, but contains good overall info about characteristics of Native made necklaces.

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Yes! I do remember seeing this. Thanks for reminding me. The first time I saw it I was trying to determine if my heishi necklaces were authentic.

The round red beads look like apple coral which is a type of sponge coral, the glossy red beads with the swiss cheese look are red coral. I don’t believe they are dyed. You could use acetone on a q-tip and see if the color comes off on the q-tip. They don’t have much value as coral because they are not considered good quality. They are pretty in their own right and its altogether a cute beachy type necklace. Well worth the 50 cents.

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Thanks snow. I tried the acetone and got nothing. I was wondering what the coral was. The two types looked pretty different. Thanks!

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Just a FYI. I am about 18.8 % Native American. The standard for saying items are Native American made is 20%. So, I cannot sell anything I make as Native American made. I was trained in Native American jewelry making by both some Navajo craftsman’s and Anishinaabe, AKA Chippewa.

The times are changing. Many with under 20% Native American blood lines are making jewelry. Always state that my items are a certain style. Then state my background and training.

There are also many new Turquoise mines that are offering some amazing pieces of rough rocks. Some of these rival Sleeping Beauty and Kingman for quality.

The times are changing and it is something everyone should be aware of.

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Wow, I had no idea about that. Good to know. Thanks!

Thank you for sharing that! It was always my understanding that the label of Native American made was permitted by being actual members of a tribe. I hadn’t considered genetic percentages.
Also- please tell us more about these new mines! It has been a goal of mine to collect stones from each mine! Thanks!!

Any mine names/locations we should be on the look-out for?

Last year I purchased turquoise from several new AZ mines. All were listed with numbers, such as Hole 3, mine 2, etc. This is great quality turquoise. Will try to post some photos tomorrow.

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