Indian Silver and Knife Photography

I saw this one in a shop in Hot Springs, Arkansas while vacationing and for some reason I had to buy it. I threw in the Schrade LB7 for scale. Fully opened it’s 14" long but the thing that got me is it’s basically a giant copy of a small whittling knife. It’s to big to use safely due to the blades not locking. It lives on a shelf with some collectible Zippo’s. It is with some assorted Zuni cluster pins of which the first one is a very nice snake eye. A string of Navajo pearls, jaklas and a bird that seems to be an eagle. Again, still working on the different birds. The Jerome Tiger print that came in the large envelope that I used for the background got wet when a water heater ruptured…bummer.

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Beautiful Zuni pieces with nice dark patina! Love the old stuff.

That large folder is actually a Copperhead pattern. Be careful with that thing or you’ll put an eye out. :grinning:

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I don’t exactly know what that means, if it’s a brand name or a style or what, but that is exactly what the box says.

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I suppose if someone really wanted to know they could Google it and find something like this:

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No need to Google, I’ll tell you. :slightly_smiling_face:

There are several different patterns of slip joint pocketknives. “Slip joint” means that the blade does not lock. The blades rely on the strength of the backspring to stay opened and closed. “Patterns” are determined by number of blades, blade styles, and handle shapes. A typical Copperhead pattern has a long clip blade and a short pen blade on the same bolster. The front bolster appears to have a finger guard, but it is actually a design feature that protects the user from the blade tang when the blade is closed.

Here is my Case Copperhead with ebony scales. As you can see, it looks just like your knife only smaller. Sorry, no Indian silver, just safari gear.

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I got this today, I like the beading on the bolsters. It says Wrangler 0318 it’s very solid and heavy for its size. Along with it, beads and buttons and earrings.

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Well darn it, that silver button got moved.

Cool knife, AC! Traditional knives always look good with Indian silver, but it would have looked even better if that button wasn’t moved. :stuck_out_tongue: :+1:

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Buck 112, buckle, and belt all from the 70s.

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I guess I’ll have to get me one of them Buck 110’s one of these days, but don’t tell anyone. :shushing_face: On the top is a Schrade SC705, another Buck 110 interpretation, with your basic faux scrimshaw on the handle scales. Then a Buck 373 and an Old Timer with a locking blade, its blade reads Schrade USA 1840T. Accompanying the knives is a Fred Harvey era spoon with crossed arrows. A small green turquoise pin. All surrounded by a nice string of trade beads with a lovely portrait of Mrs. Morgan :angel: right in the middle.

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Good stuff, AC! Those knives look well worn, which they should. That spoon is cool. Now, all you need is a fork for a complete table setting. :smiley:

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Well, if you spend all day at the “First Monday Trade Days” in Canton, TX. you gotta buy something. This is one of the things I got. Real turquoise and coral too…NOT! :rofl: However the pendant is real and by Gilbert Adakai and the ring by Sam Begay

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That knife is a nice match with your Begay ring. The good thing about colorful handles is if you drop the knife in the woods, it will be easy to find. :slightly_smiling_face:

This is not my knife, but it’s a great example of what happens when Navajo artist David Yellowhorse gets hold of a Buck knife.

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Man, I just had to stare at that for a few moments. That definitely deserves a nice lighted display case.
I agree on the colorful, one of the least bright things I’ve done was buying a camouflaged, Mag-light flashlight and almost immediately loosing it on the job. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

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I have a cuff by him that would be more cool if I had a matching knife. He used the same block turquoise material in the cuff. I have a catalog of my Dads that has several pages of all types of “gemstone” handle material.

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My dumbest was always carrying a knife back in my plumbing days. Lost the tips off of several Buck and Case knives by using them for prying off delicate faucet inserts that I didn’t have a small enough screwdriver for. Apparently wasn’t smart enough to learn after the first either. :weary:

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Love the pendant : )

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I can relate, I broke the first new one I’d ever bought with my own money. I only did it once, I think I almost cried, I’m sure I cussed. I was raised by a pack of wild plumbers. From a young age, it was, crawl under that building and tell us what you see. At 17 I went to HVAC school and haven’t plumbed anything but my own stuff since.
Plumbing Rules “Hot’s on the left, Payday is Friday, Don’t chew on your fingernails”

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One more. A Schrade melon knife or sampling knife. It’s unusual due to the serrated blade. It has the SS102 model number on the blade but doesn’t actually have Schrade on it anywhere. It’s matched with a couple of Zuni cuffs. The sun-face cuff is unsigned, the waterbird cuff is by Lynette Laiwakete. They’re all on a lidded honeysuckle basket.

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Is there a knife in that photo? All I see are two outstanding cuffs! :+1: