Inlayed bracelet

Hello,

I bought years ago this bracelet and look for identification of it’s origin and crafter.
An estimation of it’s value would help.
Thanks a lot and regards,

Pascale

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Gorgeous inlay cuff :grinning: Does it have any markings or initials anywhere on the cuff?

can you get a better photo of both end caps, no flash, natural lighting.

I was going to suggest it’s enamel work on the front, not gemstones, and then I just saw the interior with the stones, so it’s now complicated. Very interesting, still doesn’t look Native to me. The color palette and Deco-ish designs are more like Austrian enamel and Chinese things.

What were you told about it at purchase?

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Thanks for your interest. I did a little home work:

  • the mark on the side says sterling
  • the black part is not enamel or stone (lacquer?)
    -could it be attributed to Zuni silversmiths Ronnie and Ramil Glodove ?

Thanks for your help. I live in Switzerland and Native Americans experts are scarce around for the least.

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I don’t believe the Glodove’s are Zuni. Here is an earlier post that discussed them.

Ronni & Ramil Glodove?

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Yes, Filipino, and they initial-hallmarked their stuff. A Filipino origin would also explain this highly uncharacteristic piece.

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Herzlich Willkommen im Forum!

I’m familiar with this type of jewelry and it’s putative makers, which in retail stores are often made up names with phony NA bios created by the Importers and distributors of the merchandise. Chickfarmer is correct about origin. Items of this type are often made offshore, imported and then merged into commerce along side items legitimately made in the US. Although country of origin labels are required for import, these labels tend to disappear quickly once items reach our shores.

Markups are often 10 times or more the original import price of the merchandise, so assigning value is nearly impossible.

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similar workmanship current and completed listings -

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I think I’m agreeing with @mmrogers. And this posting even makes me more suspicious. “Galaxy cuff”? What does that even mean?

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galaxy cuff ground zero? - https://www.ebay.com/str/blakapinocreations

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Wow. That’s a whole lot goin’ on.

I guess I see some small planetary things in the pics you posted. But in the link…oh my. I didn’t read it all, but in the link I didn’t notice the cuffs being called Navajo.

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at least that particular seller is honest about the country of origin in their description.

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These seem very similar to @Nirel’s cuff. This one from Steve’s link has a chain and turquoise (or at least turquoise colored stone) inside.

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always been a lousy salesman…person,I mean…& this is an example. don’t see “perfect”, “celestial” or “kachina” there at all

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Agree. Most of their posts with the items begin with adjectives like, “beautiful”…“breathtaking”…etc, etc. Except one which began with “garish.” :laughing:

How bout this one…

Guess the website didn’t read the turquoise forum post from a couple days ago.

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Thanks to all of you. I know now what I’m dealing with. You’re all impressive.

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And welcome to the site; Switzerland must be a beautiful place. My sister in law’s family came from there (she got to visit once and loved it). And I believe you also posted a lovely squash blossom necklace which is a wonderful Native American find.

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Looking at the way this merchandise is “inlaid”, the colors used, and the near pixel size of some of the color sections my current theory is that the process involves first laying down the colored sections with high res multicolor 3D printing, then either laying in the black background in the same process, or back filling the “inlaid” area with a filled (finely powdered jet, or coal for opacity and texture) epoxy or acrylic. Using the type of printer linked, it would also be possible to simulate the look of inlaid stones like turquoise or lapis. I should make clear here that I don’t know if this is how these were made, but if I were an offshore manufacturer, and wanted to make a lot of this stuff at high margin to cost, that’s probably how I’d go about it.

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“garish” is perhaps the most generous word for this… stuff.

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