Mom's pin/pendant questions

So I’m going to post this pin/pendant that I inherited from my mother so that I can put off a little longer going outside to work in the yard before it gets dark.

I don’t know much about it, except that I’m pretty sure it’s Native American, because she would have bought it on one of our trips West together, and she bought only Native American jewelry. I suspect she bought it at the Hopi House at Grand Canyon, but I don’t know whether it was in '82 or '69. I was wondering if any of you experts on here would have an idea of when it could have been made - whether that would be the 60s or later since I can’t remember when she said she bought it. I just know that it has always looked like this, never shiny and new looking. And I believe the turquoise has changed a bit over time. Also, would anyone have any idea of where the turquoise could possibly be from?

It’s been one of my favorite pieces for so long; even if it’s not super well made, I still love it. I generally wear it vertically on a leather cord so that I can tie it like a choker. Sometimes I put it on a thin strand of heishi. I’ve had numerous comments on it when I travel out in the four corners area. Thanks in advance!


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That’s a great looking piece, Zia. Beautiful stones and not overdone.

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it’s gorgeous and absolutely 100% right up my alley of what i love about vintage native jewelry. It shows the hand of the maker, the stones are beautiful and not overly worked or shaped, it shows honest wear, the design is fluid and simple and highlights the stones. i hope you wear it in good health for many years.

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Thank you both! I just had no idea really. Mom didn’t know really anything about Native American jewelry but she had an eye for beautiful things. @Jemez2 I love how you said that. I’m sure that’s what my mom would have thought too.

And the post did keep me from having to deal with the devil bushes for a little while. But I tackled one.

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It’s really beautiful :heart:

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I love turquoise that’s like looking into the depths of a lake or pond, like these pretty stones. What a lovely memento.

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Thank you for all your kind comments. It’s special to me because my mom passed in 2015, and my dad died way back in '81, and they both passed on their Native American jewelry to me (my older brother and sister were fine with that, lucky me). Mom didn’t even remember on which trip she got it, and for nostalgia’s sake I’m just trying to figure out a little more about it (not for selling, just for me). So…anyone have any opinions on whether it could have been made in the 60’s? If it looks newer than that, then she prob got it on our trip in '82. Really, I’m just curious.

Also, any thoughts on where the turquoise could be from? Doesn’t look like any Kingman I have, but Kingman always surprises me. Thanks!!

Oh, any millennials or younger on here just be very careful about calling it “old” if it was made in the 60s! LOL😂

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Gorgeous, Ziacat. Looks like natural Blue Gem to me. Old school!

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Thank you! I love their deep color. Mom used to wear it as a pin (as it was made) on a velvet blouse. I don’t really wear pins so I use a converter and use it as a pendant.

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Was it worn right at the neckline as in traditional Navajo dress? It looks like it was originally that sort of pin.

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I hadn’t even thought about that, makes sense! Mom didn’t wear it that way. She usually wore it just on the side of the button placket, but her top was more like a velvet shirt jacket. I don’t remember how she wore it when she got it so many years ago. Maybe they could have told her what you suggested when she bought it; I just have no memory at all of it. But if she bought it in 69 I would have only been four. I so, so wish I had asked her more, but then she’d often say, that was so long ago I don’t remember.

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